3 Reasons You May Be Having Foot Pain

You are on your feet constantly, and they take you anywhere and everywhere that you must go. Therefore, it makes sense that 80% of Americans have suffered some kind of foot problem at some point in their lives, with 50% of individuals reporting that it affects their overall quality of life. You probably don't give your feet much thought until they begin giving you discomfort. When you are having foot pain, here are three potential reasons why.

Start Running And Now Foot Hurts? You May Have Plantar Fasciitis

If you have just started running and your foot hurts along the bottom, you need to stop running until you determine what is causing the pain. One thing that may be wrong is your foot has plantar fasciitis. There is a ligament in the arch of your foot, which is known as the plantar fascia. When you run and your foot hits the pavement this ligament pulls and then tightens. Doing this over and over causes irritation to the ligament.

How Often To Have A PAP Smear

With how often the recommendations for women's health testing change, who can keep up? Years ago women were urged to see their doctors each year for a breast and pelvic exam to include a PAP smear. Today, women under 60 without health problems need to be seen for an annual well woman exam, but only once every three years does this exam need to include a PAP smear. Why the change, and what does this mean for you?

Tips To Make It Through Your First Few Days Of Opioid Withdrawal

The primary reason why opioids are so difficult to wean yourself off of is the withdrawal symptoms. Within hours of quitting, you'll feel miserable -- nauseous, irritable, and dizzy. Taking a withdrawal treatment that your doctor prescribes can really help. But you will still want to follow these tips as you navigate your first few days without opiates.  Keep diphenhydramine on hand. One thing that can really help when you start to feel nauseous is taking a dose of diphenhydramine.

Growing Older? How You Can Benefit By Seeing A Geriatrician

Although aging is a very normal part of life, there are often a lot of misconceptions about the process. As you grow older, it's natural for your body to change in certain ways. If you aren't prepared for the differences, it can be very startling, and even quite frightening. Seeing your general physician is certainly helpful but if you really want to work with someone who understands the aging process in a more in-depth way you should see a geriatrician.